Remembering Japanese cars from the past

Category: rustoseums (Page 1 of 11)

Only some cosmetic damage on this Mazda Cosmo Sport – Japanese Rustoseums

There is only some cosmetic damage on this Mazda Cosmo Sport. Nothing bad to write about. All it needs is just a little refresher on the paint. Maybe a little TLC on the suspension. And perhaps it needs a patch or two on the bodywork. But definitely not more than that!

Just some cosmetic damage on this Mazda Cosmo Sports series II
Just some cosmetic damage on this Mazda Cosmo Sport Series II

Mazda Cosmo Series I and Series II

For those unaware what a Mazda Cosmo Sport is: when Mazda was able to create their own reliable engine from the NSU licensed engine, they needed a car to showcase it. This became the Mazda Cosmo Sport, also better known as the Mazda Cosmo 110S outside Japan, and was presented in 1964. 80 cars were extensively tested between 1965 and 1966. Only 1967 the Cosmo became available for the general public and already received a facelift in July 1968. This was then called the Series II and it only received minor changes, where the room between the door and the rear fender was extended by 1.5 inches.

This Mazda Cosmo Sport is a Series II car. In the photo above you can see the space between the door and the rear fender is longer than on the Series I car. According to the blog posts (here and here) I found this posted on, this car is located in Okinawa. We can also deduce this from the license plate 沖55 め6.62: the first character is for the Okinawa prefecture.

Road tax

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Toyota AE86 consumed by the woods – Japanese Rustoseums

Last week I already posted an abandoned kouki two-door Toyota Sprinter Trueno AE86 that started to be consumed by the foliage of the fields surrounding it. This week, I have another Toyota AE86 that is slowly being consumed by the woods.

Toyota AE86 slowly consumed by the woods
Toyota AE86 slowly consumed by the woods

This AE86 is so far gone, I can’t even tell whether it’s a Levin or a Trueno! What I can tell, is that this is a two-door facelift model. The small holes next to the tail lights are made to fit the inner reverse lights of the facelifted two-door tail lights. In the picture below you can see the difference between the two:

zenki vs kouki two-door AE86 tail lights compared
zenki vs kouki two-door AE86 tail lights compared

As you can see, there is a small reverse light mounted right under where the bootlid slopes down to its lowest point. So having these small holes in the rear at least give us the indication it is a kouki model.

The roof has caved in with various tree branches around it, so probably the roof was hit by those branches. The AE86 once was yellow and painted over in white. The white paint is slowly disappearing, showing the car’s true colours. As the boot is also yellow, I would assume it was yellow from factory

Found at: Nekotani’s blog

Two-door Trueno AE86 hidden in the foliage – Japanese Rustoseums

It is always sad to see a forgotten or neglected car. It’s bad if the car in question is parked up for a long time and is showing signs of rust and decay. It’s even worse if the car is slowly being consumed by the foliage around it. This two-door Toyota Sprinter Trueno AE86 is one such car!

Abandoned rusty two-door Sprinter Trueno AE86
Abandoned rusty two-door Sprinter Trueno AE86

Eaten by the foliage

The Minkara user mitanimomo investigated this neglected Trueno left behind in the fields. The owner could not be traced and, just like the car, the house next to it was abandoned.

The Trueno appears to be original panda, which would indicate it’s a GT Apex model. The doily lace covers are still on the seats. And it seems to be sitting on Work Equip Casting 4 spoke rims.

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Honda Life Step into my grave wagon – Japanese Rustoseums

The Honda Life Step is a van based on the Honda Life Kei car. The Honda Life was a successor to the popular Honda N360 and N600 (only abroad). Unfortunately, Honda stopped exporting their Kei offerings as soon as the Life replaced the N360/N600. This means we never got to enjoy these cars outside Japan. That makes me extra sad to find these magnificent Kei cars rusting away in their natural habitat.

Honda Life Step rusting away slowly
Honda Life Step rusting away slowly

This example seems to be parked in someone’s yard. Photos like these make me wonder where people then actually sit in their gardens. I mean, you can’t sit down next to a big pile of rust, right?

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Nissan 240RS trio in a Zimbabwean junkyard – Japanese Rustoseums

After a car has fulfilled its role it often is brought to the junkyard to be dismantled and die. Sometimes a car hasn’t fulfilled its role and gets a second lease in life. And sometimes a car that hasn’t fulfilled its role can’t get a second lease in life because of reasons. For this trio of Nissan 240RS rallycars, I can only guess why they got stuck in a Zimbabwean junkyard.

Trio of Nissan 240RS rally cars stuck in Zimbabwean junkyard
Trio of Nissan 240RS rally cars stuck in Zimbabwean junkyard
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Rustheap junkyard – Japanese rustoseums

According to Daniel O’Grady from Wasabi Cars, rusty cars are slowly disappearing from the streets of Japan. This is mostly due to the increase in the price of steel and people actively knocking on people’s doors and offer to take them for free. Luckily I still have heaps of Japanese rustoseum photos in my drafts folder, so I have many more to post here on the blog before I run out of them!

This week we have a junkyard in the Kami district in the Miyagi prefecture. According to the blog poster, the owner doesn’t see it as a junkyard, but as a treasure trove!

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